install theme

“I thought it was very interesting that in our self-sufficient western democracies, we don’t want to bother with defending democracy. Perhaps we don’t even vote. And yet when we [don’t] have democracy, we’re willing to die for it. And that is an interesting dilemma; how can we stand up for democracy when so many are so cynical about it? That was perhaps the very beginning of Borgen for me,” said Price.

Not all of the characters in Borgen are admirable, and most struggle with moral imperatives and judgements required in the business of government and media. There are no ‘good guys’ like there are on the more glossy and blithely idealistic West Wing. Yet occasionally the characters in Borgen actually believe in something, and represent possibility in politics and media. Watching politician protagonist Birgitte Nyborg negotiate career and family while also retaining her humanity and values is an important representation of womanhood in the modern age.

Goddamn I will miss Borgen.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/01/30/comment-where-are-all-good-australian-political-dramas

This scene with the Bombay and the sink-fixing driver is gpoy 

This scene with the Bombay and the sink-fixing driver is gpoy 

I see a theme here.

Classy dame

Classy dame

algorithmic poetry doesn’t get much better than this

algorithmic poetry doesn’t get much better than this

I can’t claim to have always enjoyed reading Cormac McCarthy’s novels, but I always feel such a sense of satisfaction and revelation when I’m nearing the end. The man takes you on a journey - both literally and figuratively.

Reading the central novel in the Border trilogy, The Crossing, has given me some perspective on The Road, which will definitely stand re-reading now. 

Such a horrific, beautiful narrative. The meditations on death are sublime.

But the eyeball scene. The eyeball scene will stay with me always.

“The wicked know that if the ill they do be of sufficient horror that men will not speak against it. That men have just enough stomach for small evils and only these will they oppose. He said that true evil has power to sober the smalldoer against his own deeds and in the contemplation of that evil he may even find the path of righteousness which has been foreign to his feet and may have no power but to go upon it.

Even this man may be appalled at what is revealed to him and seek some order to stand against it. Yet in all of this there are two things which perhaps he will not know. He will not know that while the order which the righteous seek is never righteousness itself but is only order, the disorder of evil is in fact the thing itself. Nor will he know that while the righteous are hampered at every turn by their ignorance of evil to the evil all is plain, light and dark alike.

This man of which we speak will seek to impose order and lineage upon things which rightly have none. He will call upon the world itself to testify as to the truth of what are in fact but his desires. In his final incarnation he may seek to indemnify his words with blood for by now he will have discovered that words pale and lose their savor while pain is always new.” 

(Source: viciouslycyd)

Famous last meals - I would be happy with either Cleopatra’s or James Gandolfini’s. 

Famous last meals - I would be happy with either Cleopatra’s or James Gandolfini’s. 

Paris Review - William Gibson

Do you think of your last three books as being science fiction?

GIBSON

No, I think of them as attempts to disprove the distinction or attempts to dissolve the boundary. They are set in a world that meets virtually every criteria of being science fiction, but it happens to be our world, and it’s barely tweaked by the author to make the technology just fractionally imaginary or fantastic. It has, to my mind, the effect of science fiction.

If you’d gone to a publisher in 1981 with a proposal for a science-fiction novel that consisted of a really clear and simple description of the world today, they’d have read your proposal and said, Well, it’s impossible. This is ridiculous. This doesn’t even make any sense. Granted, you have half a dozen powerful and really excellent plot drivers for that many science-fiction n­ovels, but you can’t have them all in one novel.

INTERVIEWER

What are those major plot drivers?

GIBSON

Fossil fuels have been discovered to be destabilizing the planet’s climate, with possibly drastic consequences. There’s an epidemic, highly contagious, lethal sexual disease that destroys the human immune system, raging virtually uncontrolled throughout much of Africa. New York has been attacked by Islamist fundamentalists, who have destroyed the two tallest buildings in the city, and the United States in response has invaded Afghanistan and Iraq.

INTERVIEWER

And you haven’t even gotten to the technology.

GIBSON

You haven’t even gotten to the Internet. By the time you were telling about the Internet, they’d be showing you the door. It’s just too much science fiction.

Paris Review

Fucked up fairytales

If there is a normality here, it’s a state of near-catatonia.DSM-5 seems to have no definition of happiness other than the absence of suffering. The normal individual in this book is tranquilized and bovine-eyed, mutely accepting everything in a sometimes painful world without ever feeling much in the way of anything about it. The vast absurd excesses of passion that form the raw matter of art, literature, love, and humanity are too distressing; it’s easier to stop being human altogether, to simply plod on as a heaped collection of diagnoses with a body vaguely attached.

DSM-5 is a dystopian novel

What did the one per cent spend their money on in the Roaring Twenties?

(Source: makemestfu)

holdentumblr:

Emotionally Unavailable

I love her

holdentumblr:

Emotionally Unavailable

I love her

(Source: kisedbyfire)

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